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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the state department, where outgoing secretary hillary clinton will deliver remarks on for employees. she officially steps down today. senator john kerry of massachusetts was confirmed by the senate on tuesday to be her replacement. he is expected to be sworn in the day by the supreme court justice sonia sotomayor. in the meantime, we will have live coverage of the secretary clinton's earmarks around at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. president obama will honor the recipients of the national medal of science and national medal of technology and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an i
in the south china sea. i daresay as interesting as it may sound, and my present -- secretary clinton who made her first trip to asia, i have heard rumors to the effect incoming secretary of state kerry will make its first trip to the middle east. we are going to pivot to asia,. back to the middle east seems to repave it. host: -- repivot. host: u.s. sanctions are proving counterproductive. the economy is in ruins. the countrydeadlocked in the cos heading toward sectarian breakup. the grim prognosis for syria is provided by the latest report provided by the state department working with the free syrian army. guest: i admire him and i know he has been writing quite a bit about him lately. he is symptomatic of the disease that has set into washington, which is a new-found interest in syria. when the revolution began, to find voices of concern over syria was a virtually impossible treasure hunt. we were expressing deep concern than that unless we involve ourselves, when i say involved, i will be careful -- once we did what we could politically to get the disparate opposition groups more organized
with the consequences -- consequences of those decisions. the global jihadist threat that secretary clinton pointed out does not have the belief that a democracy is a good idea. that a people electing representatives in a republican form of government is a good idea. they believed that we need some religious leader like the ayatollah khomeini or now in iran. they need a religious leader like that that tells us what we can do, that makes all his decisions under shari'a law. . all of those who met during the revolution, they believed in the power of prayer to god, and that's why they prayed during that time, but they wanted much to have the chance to worship as they chose. be they muslim, hindu. but especially judeo-christian beliefs where jews and christians had traditionally suffered so much persecution. they wanted the chance for people to worship as they please or not worship, but they knew to make that possible had he had to -- they had to pray to god. that's why we are observing once again tomorrow the national prayer breakfast where our president will speak, where we will have a fantastic testimon
budget cuts known as sequestration. >> question. when former president clinton took the helm during an economic downturn, he said he had a quote laser-like focus on the economy. how would you describe the focus of president obama's state of the union pat buchanan? >> he did pivot back toward the jobs and the economy but overall this was a very libbal brail speech, something we have all heard before nothing new in it and a dead on aarrival speech. he is not going to get the minimum wage, not going to get the assault weapons ban, not going to get amnesty, not an awful lot of the things he has in there. he is appealing to his base and appealing to what he sees as the majority of the country, which probably does support most of what he said. it was a very political speech but in terms of what is going to be abe complished i don't think it was at all relevant. >> eleanor? >> it was in tune with the country. he is going to get immigration reform, something he can call a victory on guns, probably universal background checks and legislation to curb gun trafficking, the gun that killed the y
certainly have seen since. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton on the u.s. role in the world. she's at the council of foreign relations today for now and will meet with president from the white house tomorrow, her last day as secretary. her successor senator john kerry will be at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [inaudible conversations] [applause] [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla he'll who is with us today, the entire board of directors and their members can't i want to welcoming you to the council on foreign relations and i'm richard haas president of cfr. are those of you who don't know who we are, we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six a
hillary clinton on the u.s. role in the world. she was at the council on foreign relations today for an hour and will meet with president obama and the white house tomorrow her last day of secretary. her successors and it should john kerry opie at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla hills who is with us today and the entire board of directors and the members i want to welcome you to the council on foreign relations. i'm richard haas president of the cfr. for those of you who don't know who we are we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to h
, with a number of the university's distinguished alumni. in particular president clinton, and he and i during the time i was both o.m.b. director and then as his chief of staff, would spend many hours of conversation talking about his experience as a southern baptist getting a catholic education. he talked about it a lot. and also during my time, obviously, in the obama administration i greatly benefited from many of the georgetown graduates. i had the honor to have someone as my chief of staff, jeremy bash, who graduated here from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extr
following today's session in the house at 11:00 a.m. eastern this morning. secretary of state clinton officially steps down today. john kerry will be sworn in today. was confirmed by the senate and will be sworn in by justice sotomayor. live coverage starting at 2:30 eastern. remarks atclinton's an event yesterday at the council on foreign relations where she talked about the need for smart power diplomacy. afterwards she to questions about the future of the american political system. this is about an hour. >> please take your seats. good afternoon. on behalf of our members, i want to welcome to the council on foreign relations. i'm president of the cfr. we're an independent membership organization, a think tank, and the publisher dedicated to the foreign policy choices facing this country. we are continuing secretary of state week at the council. we were fortunate to hear from george shultz on tuesday night who was secretary of state for some six and half years under ronald reagan. we're honored to host hilary rodham clinton during the last 24 hours as president obama's first secreta
of state hillary clinton gives farewell remarks at the state department. on c-span2, from the national black caucus of state legislators, a discussion about institutional racism. on c-span3, a look at the battle of extremists in mali. coming up next, looking at the economy. patrick reese gives the january jobs report. after that, the national school choice week and looking at international adoptions and why russia won't allow americans to adopt anymore. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. on tuesday, the american enterprise institute hosted a panel of scholars to preview president obama's upcoming state of the union address and how foreign policy and national security will be addressed in the president's second term. this is one hour and 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, folks. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, folks. can i please get everybody to sit down and speak quietly? i think we are going to start here. good afternoon, everybody. i am danielle pletka. i am from the american enterprise institute. welcom
. >> with respect to keystone, secretary clinton put in place a very open and transparent process which i am committed to seeing through. i can guarantee you that it will be fair and transparent, accountable. and we hope that we will be able to be in a position to make an announcement in the near term. >>gretchen: here to weigh in, michigan's republican representative fred upton, who by the way, wants us to call him fred. i'm going to do what you want. all right, fred, what do you think of john kerry? is he going to flip-flop on this and now be in favor of the keystone pipeline? >> it's been four and a half years they have been studying this. we know the safest way to transport this oil is by pipeline. canada is going to increase production to four million barrels per day before the end of the decade. they are going to send it either to china or build a pipeline east to the atlantic and put it on a boat to send it to new orleans. isn't it better to put it on a pipeline that is going to be more efficient and getting it to the right place? >>brian: it is as frustrating following governor cuomo
. about 1998. president clinton launched tomahawk missiles based on the embassies blown up in a staffer cut and launched tomahawks into this again and in east afghanistan. they hit targets. if you asked any of us in the room the next morning whether america was at work, i trust all of us would've said no. we fired some tomahawk missiles, but we are not at war. if you ask people in it the impact of this tomahawk missiles, they have a different view. so the danger it can potentially lower willingness to use force and not conservatives were and yet you build up enemies. keep other people who think they are at war with you. when did al qaeda go to war with the united states? the average answer is 9/11. al qaeda declared war against the united states in 1996. most of us didn't get the memo. but they attacked the cole, attacked east africa. the report says. as a danger when one side is how bored any other is an outworn both ways. the danger about this technology is that. anytime you can sit back and safety and do something for somebody else, you don't necessarily feel now. if your son or daug
senator kerry and senator hagel to senator -- then-senator hillary clinton and bob gates. by that standard both the new nominees lack gravitas. they're not independent thinkers, they have no track record of either legislating in an intellectual sense or advancing important ideas on military affairs or interor national politics. international politics. but the underlying cause, i would say, is it's a reflection to have president's lack of interest in these issues. >> anybody else? >> yeah. i've got another pet phrase to introduce into this discussion. the republican party is now focused on trying to be responsible about what kind of fiscal environment we leave to our children and grandchildren, which i think is good in general terms. and so we're very worried about the deficit. and what kind of deficit we're going to be leaving to our heirs. there was a national security deficit that is growing and that will continue to grow. it's a particularly american conceit that the world goes away or stops when we stop paying attention to it. the fact of the matter is that the problems that we see in
. every budget summit that i had been a part of in the reagan years, first bush years, during the clinton administration, every budget summit we knew that defense had to play a role in trying to be able to control our deficits. soon after i became secretary, i was handed a number of $487 billion, almost half a trillion dollars that i was to cut out of the defense budget. it was contained in the budget control act, and i was required to be able to get that number of savings over the next 10 years. after a decade of blank check spending in the department of defense, it was important for us, the leaders of the department, chairman of the joint chiefs, the service chiefs, the service secretaries and myself who strongly believe that we had to meet this challenge of reducing the defense budget but we had to do it in a way that simply would not hallow out the force. we came out of every other period, every other war, we made the terrible mistake of hallowing out the force coming out of world war ii, coming out of korea, coming out of vietnam, coming out of the cold war. the attitude was, just cu
.s. diplomat in the canadian capital during the clinton administration. john manly is the chief exhibit of the council's chief executives. you can't get much more execs than that. he's a former prime minister of finance, foreign affairs and trade and industry. he led the response to the 9/11 attacks and chaired the independent task force on the future of north america david is with the national security program at the center for strategic international studies here in washington and a former senior official of the u.s. energy department and was involved in negotiations for the u.s.-canada free trade agreement and the north american free trade agreement. and rita savage is the bureau chief. in a moment our conversation begins we will hear from all of our guests on the stage and also from our studio audience a little bit later. first let's take the next five minutes and bring some context to the conversation. >> of almost every level, the u.s.-canada relationship though occasionally up by the storm is the envy of the world. integrated industries and economies, the world's largest trade mo
, if the president had been willing to go back to bill clinton taxes on all. he was not. it is the height of hypocrisy to come in 30 days, actually in about one day, and begin talking about the next round of tax increases on a relatively limited group on our population, the 1% or 3%, and in fact start reducing their ability to have working capital for new oil exploration, for new natural gas exploration. the thing that the president just a few days ago standing in front of where you are today lauded as great, we are becoming oil self-sufficient, we are natural gas self-sufficient, we are able to move to cleaner fuels for our energy. but let's break something else down. my opponent, i keep saying opponent, he's my ranking member, but he is the loyal opposition here, he he talks about $100 billion. i think we need to break it down. that's $100 billion over 10 years. it's not even $10 billion in the first year. his $100 billion of sacrifice, many of those sacrifices won't even occur because people aren't going to necessarily be here for all 10 years, because next year or the year after this
. there is no jumping from this generation of energy production to the next overnight. even president clinton, even al gore when he was vice president talked about the transition that we have to go through. i see this pipeline as a transition. it's giving us oil from one of our closest, most dependable and friendliest of all allies, canada, as opposed to pushing us over the next five or ten years to continuing to do business with countries that do not share our values like the leadership, unfortunately, in venezuela today or the problems with countries in the northeast, even the saudis who we respect in some ways do not have the same value system as the united states. we would much rather -- at least my constituents would much rather deal with canada and mexico. not only are they better allies, but for louisiana, we like working in canada. it's a little closer to home. we like working in mexico. and since many of these workers on these rigs and in this business come from louisiana and texas, let me be crystal clear. my colleagues that are helping on this are absolutely right. the people of louisiana w
of the team. that process exists. what secretary clinton asked me to do soon after benghazi, was to collaborate to see if we could make improvements to that system. >> general, thanks for your service. and mr. secretary, it has been n honor to have you. >> mr. secretary and general, thank you for being here and i would like to associate myself with senator cruz's comments. i'm a first year senator and i'm in the process of hiring a legislative assistant for this committee and you go back to california and get nostalgic for this committee, let me know. >> been there, done there. >> the crete base, given that was pretty close in terms of transportation time, why was not an option to get people there faster? >> the bases that we have in southern europe, in the mediterranean area are generally speaking have aircraft. the first point i made is that it wasn't the right tool for the particular threat we faced. secondly, the aircraft we have in europe, certainly are there in support of nato and on a different alert posture that th faster? >> the bases that we have in southern europe
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)